A 2013 Sundance Film Festival documentary has left many people, from all around the world, aching to visit the orcas of British Columbia. Blackfish, a film created after the death of SeaWorld trainer Dawn Brancheau, sheds a new and powerful light on the life of a killer whale in captivity. Written by Gabriela Cowperthwaite, Eli Despres and Tim Zimmerman, Blackfish explores the life and psyche of Tilikum, an orca captured in 1983 and held captive at SeaWorld. Although an extremely sad story describing our cruelty toward such a beautiful creature, Blackfish is completely changing the way humans look at whales in captivity, while also allowing people to make their own decision. Is it right to keep any animal in captivity for our entertainment? We believe that these majestic creatures are best viewed in the wild - where they belong. Let us help you plan an incredible summer, 2014 trip to visit the orcas in their natural waters of Johnstone Strait, on the eastern coast of British Columbia. Learn about the culture and natural history of the area while eating spectacular food and exploring the remote wilderness surrounding you. Best of all, the non-invasive nature of a kayak and our committment to responsible whale watching means that you can glimpse the orcas without harming them. Also, be sure to check out Blackfish, airing Thursday, October 24, 2013 at 9:00 PM ET on CNN. It is also playing in select theaters nationwide, and available on DVD.

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kayaking with orcas

Is It Safe to Kayak With Orcas in British Columbia?

Is It Safe to Kayak With Orcas in British Columbia?

The scientific name for orca whales, Orcinus orca, literally translates to “Demon of the Deep.” In English, they are most commonly known as killer whales. Both names suggest that they are dangerous animals, to be feared, and kept at a safe distance.